Photo:

Anna Remington

My CV

Education:

University of Cambridge 2001-2004; University College London 2004-2005 & 2006-2009

Qualifications:

BA (Hons), MSc, PhD, CPsychol

Work History:

After finishing my PhD in 2009, I worked as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, London before moving to the University of Oxford where I was the Scott Junior Research Fellow in Autism and Related Disorders at University College until 2013.

Current Job:

Lecturer in Cognitive Science at the Centre for Research in Autism and Education (CRAE)

Employer:

UCL Institute of Education

My Interview

Me and my work

I am a cognitive scientist interested in attention and perception in autism. I find it fascinating how autistic adults and children see the world differently from those without autism. In particular, my work focuses on superior abilities in the condition: situations where autistic people perform better than non-autistic people.

My research tries to figure out what is causing these advantages, in what circumstances they occur, and how we can use them in the classroom and workplace to improve learning and employment outcomes for autistic people.

Typical day

There is no typical day! Each day is a unique mix of research, teaching, presenting, meeting with students… The variety always keeps it interesting!

What topics do you work on?

Autism, attention, perception, development

What methods do you use?

I mostly use behavioural methods such as reaction times, accuracy and questionnaires. I also sometimes use brain scanning techniques such as MEG and EEG.

Who was your favourite teacher?

Dr David Robson at North London Collegiate School – an inspiring maths teacher who really cared about his students, even the quiet ones!